Complete Streets Program

Complete Streets Workshop

Thursday, April 26, 5:30-7:30PM
Putnam Hall
Inside the Arlington Municipal Airport Office
18204 59th Avenue NE, Arlington

Directions from I-5
Directions from downtown Arlington

The City of Arlington, with consultant Toole Design Group, will be holding an informational workshop for the Complete Street Program. This workshop is an opportunity for Arlington residents to give input that can help shape the program for the specific needs of our community.

This program will influence how our road system and development moves forward and what that means in terms of design, safety, accessibility, aesthetics and maintenance.

What is the Complete Streets Program?

The Complete Streets Program aims to address the needs of all users when development and redevelopment of traffic corridors are proposed within the City of Arlington, including people who drive, family and commuter cyclists, pedestrians, people with accessibility needs, and people who use transit. It also focuses on the aesthetics of our streets.

Complete Streets puzzle pieces

Why Complete Streets?

Community design in America has been focused on automobiles for more than 50 years.  In that time Americans are getting less exercise, diseases linked to inactivity have skyrocketed, and obesity has increased in both adults and children.  The Complete Streets Program is about re-thinking the way we layout roads in the future for our community and to improve access for all users.  Providing safe routes to school may give parents the peace of mind they need to allow their kids to bike or walk to school.  A trail between your housing development and local grocery store may increase your likelihood to walk for butter and eggs.  A bike lane might make it possible to leave your car at home in the morning on your way to catch your bus or vanpool.  Creating a walkable community may not change your habits, but if your children begin to think in a different way we can improve their future health.

Do all Complete Streets Look the Same?

No. Complete Streets vary based on the needs of the community.  Bike lanes, like the cross section shown in Example 1, may only be needed on main commuter routes, while a mixed use trail might be a better option for a collector.  A local neighborhood residential road might be considered a complete street, like in Example 2, if traffic volumes and speeds are low enough for families to feel comfortable biking on the street.

Example 1

Complete Streets Example 1

Example 2

Complete Streets Example 2

Complete Streets Program Schedule

Complete Streets Schedule